Saturday, October 28, 2006

Autumn Color


We are at the height (or just slightly past) of autumn color on the leaves. Wind has blown some trees "naked" already, but the majority of the woods I'm viewing from my desk this morning are in full, glorious reds, oranges, and yellows.

There are black walnuts on the ground. They need to be harvested and put out on the driveway for hull removal when the truck drives over them. I don't know if that will happen to any great extent this year, but I'll work on it a little. If not hulled quickly, little worms invade the hard outer shell and the nuts are ruined.

I haven't seen any shagbark hickories this year. 'Good thing I shelled and froze some last year.

As I looked out the window this morning, I thought my eyes were "seeing things" as the white fog bank between the dark mountains and the bright line of trees was moving fast downward. Careful watching revealed that the fog is actually rolling down the valleys, over the ridges, and into the next valley from North to South, quickly as the sun rises. It rained yesterday and last night, so there must be a lot of moisture that is burning off. It was totally foggy up here on the hill for a few minutes, and then totally clear as the fog migrated down to the lower part of our farm. It must be interesting to observe this from airplanes in the early morning.

Right now, the wind is moving the fog bank from West to East, creating occasional high plumes of cloud. It is like a moving river quickly exiting the valley as morning progresses.

Renovations on the greenhouse are progressing. Glass-paned doors are now installed between greenhouse sections so that we can maintain heat zones. We need to replace the broken furnace this coming week before the colder weather comes in. Slightly below freezing nights have made little impact on the plants inside, but soon we'll need some heat to keep the plants alive through the winter nights.

On today's agenda: continue cleaning out the vegetable garden so that it can be tilled sometime during the winter. Start putting the "storm windows" in the chicken house. We'll have a warmer week coming up but it wouldn't be wise to slack off on winter preparations.

4 comments:

UKBob said...

Can I ask what sort of fuel do you plan to heat the greenhouse with? I use Propane gas as the main heat source with electric as a back-up.

Redhen said...

Bob,
We are much like you. We inherited a Propane connected furnace when we bought the place. There are two tanks behind the greenhouse, so we're going to purchase three propane wall furnaces and "gang" them up, one in each section.

We also have a bunch of small electric heaters which we used for emergencies and a couple of kerosene heaters in case the electricity goes off. I hate the smell of the burning kerosene, so will put those away unless needed.

UKBob said...

I don't like Kerosene either, I like electric but its quite expensive and can go off at times so the propane is good. Thank you for visiting my blog, I will reply to your comment in a posting some time in the near future.

Leslie Shelor said...

The season is changing so quickly; here we are having cold, clear nights and there was a heavy frost this morning.